A NIDing I Will Go

It’s that time again; the National Immunuisation Days are upon us. The yearly NID programme consists of two rounds (cryptically called NID 1 and NID 2) where the Ministry of Health dispatches just about everyone into the field to find children and make them cry (also make them safer).

This will be my third NID (not counting the emergency Measles immunisation drives) and sadly also my last.

It’s a great opportunity to get out into da bush, meet new and interesting people, camp out under the stars like a real man, do good works ™ and as an added bonus make children cry.

Unfortunately for NID 1 I’m tied to Opuwo and so will just be going out on a daily basis then returning at night (or not returning because I’m stuck in mud/water/quicksand/on rocks). Though this has the added bonus of sleeping in my bed every night it lacks the tough real manliness and camaraderie of camping out in the middle of nowhere.

I’m tied to Opuwo thanks to one thing; the naughty modem.

In April we had a lightning-caused power surge on the Telecom network in Opuwo. It took out my ADSL router, my laptop and also the work baseband modem used to connect one of our networks to head office in Windhoek.

This left nobody able to connect to the central finance, HR or intranet systems and rather than being seen as a bonus holiday was met with consternation.

Getting a new modem would take over a week but luckily Telecom had a spare second-hand one in Opuwo and was able to bring it over the next morning and after a little setting-wrangling, prayer and repeated reboots we were back online.

All was well.

But since then and with increasing frequency a red light keeps coming up on the new modem and the connection is lost.

I could bore you with details of what this light may mean or the tests I’ve performed on the line and so on in a veiled and pathetic attempt to look like I might know what I’m talking about but I’ll spare you that (this once).

Suffice to say that on a regular basis the connection to head office is lost. People will then come and see me, usually I’m already in the room with it in cursing, and ask what the problem is (no doubt assuming I’ve broken something).

Usually turning it off and back on will solve the problem (as with 94.8721% of all IT problems) but sometimes, like today, it doesn’t and I’m left trying to find someone on the phone at Telecom or our WAN company who can turn their end off and back on.

I’ve previously pointed to the modem and said ‘it may be faulty’ or explained that the line is down and I’m trying to find out which bit is broken. Mostly this was met with blank stares. Until I pointed generally at the equipment and told someone ‘it is very naughty’ at which their eyes lit up and understanding was reached. So this has now become my formal description of the problem.

“Status report Mister David?”

“It continues to be naughty Meme”

I have now managed to open a fault with Telecom for the ongoing problem (previously they would open a fault when the line was down, when I reset the modem and it was back up the fault would be closed) so I have high (no doubt foolish) hopes we can get it sorted allowing me to get out deep into da bush for NID 2.

Here’s a picture of the GRN network rack. The naughty modem is the white box in the middle:

Rack Open Showing Naughty Baseband Modem

And here it is in close-up with some detailed technical information:

Naughty Baseband Modem Close

See – I know all about the flashy lights and what about those arrows done in MS Paint? Truly I am l33t to the max.

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